The best vegan clothing brands

Let’s shop sustainably when looking for clothes

Clothes on hangers

by Piper Huxley |

Vegan clothing isn’t that much different from normal clothing, except it’s made ethically without any animal products. For example, vegan clothing would not allow fur, leather, silk, feathers, and some wool. Instead, it’s usually made from acrylic or other synthetic fibre.

According to a recent survey, the main reason for Brits being vegan or trying vegan products is due to worries of environmental impacts (38 per cent) and concerns over animal welfare (36 per cent). It’s safe to say that the UK is becoming aware of the things that mainstream clothing brands are doing wrong, so are turning to support independent, sustainable vegan brands instead.

Related: 14 eco-friendly clothing brands in the UK

However, it's not all bad news. Of course, we're seeing more mainstream brands consciously improving their practices and updating their ranges to become vegan.

Unfortunately, some companies have been accused of 'greenwashing', meaning they appear more eco-friendly than they actually are.

This isn’t to say that shopping at regular, high-street stores is a bad idea, and we don’t want to be deterring you from getting stellar deals from ordinary brands.

But, if vegan clothing is something you’re wanting to invest in, we’ve formed a list of the best sustainable brands available in the UK.

Who knows? You might find something you really like.

The best vegan clothing brands to check out:

Bhumi

With Bhumi, every purchase has a positive environmental and social impact.

Bhumi wants to “make a positive impact on our planet and the people, by inspiring everyone to make positive consumer choices.”

Its brand of certified organic cotton is ethically made with non-toxic dyes, and the organisation makes a stand against hazardous and unhealthy working conditions.

They are dedicated to “redefining luxury and reshaping conventional industry practices”. Their ethos is strong and their message is clear.

Let’s have a look at their organic garments and homeware.

Solios

Solios believe “big changes start with small actions that don’t compromise one’s lifestyle and habits.” Solios make sustainable wristwatches that have thoughtful designs, whilst looking at the big picture of their impact.

Their watches are powered by solar energy! Solios focus on minimising their manufacturing environmental footprint. They don’t use single-use plastic, collaborate with rainforest restoration and are conscious of toxic waste.

Not only this, but their silicone straps are eco-friendly and vegan. Let’s take a look.

Lucy & Yak

Lucy and Yak is the Editor’s Favourite.

From their hiring process to their models, they strive for diversity and “real people” being at the heart of their campaigns. They’ve gradually rolled out extended sizing and will continue to look at other sizing ranges like Petite and Tall.

98 per cent of their fabrics are organic or recycled, so they reduce their environmental footprint. Their cotton is organic, the dyes are non-toxic, and the polyester used is made from recycled plastic bottles. How fantastic!

They make funky vegan trousers, dungarees, dresses, accessories - and more.

Ecoalf

Ecoalf is convinced that the planet is “facing critical time and there is a need to take action”. Their ethos focuses on the planet, people and materials.

All Ecoalf’s decisions are under constant evaluation with the goal of causing the least harm possible to the planet and local communities. They recognise the complexity of the fashion supply chain and work on every step to minimise the impact as much as possible.

They work with partners for a “deeper change” as they see their responsibilities as social, as well as environmental. Their materials are vegan friendly and recycled.

Komodo

Since 1988, Komodo has been making clothes ethically and sustainably. They are passionate about “protecting and nurturing our planet, but… also love fashion and don’t believe the two need to be mutually exclusive.”

They work closely with their factories to ensure their garments are produced in a safe working environment. All suppliers work within their ethos to reduce the environmental impact of their operations and processes.

They use premium quality organic, natural and eco fibres, breaking new ground with innovative fabrics. Most of their products are vegan and all are cruelty-free.

Here are some of our favourites.

Everlane

Everlane has a mission that they call “Radical Transparency”.

It essentially means that they share every aspect of their process with us, so there’s a synergy between the customer and the brand. Everything is laid on the table: from the materials, the ethical factories to the cost. Isn’t that cool?

They’re not big on trends and instead, their products are made to last.

They’re constantly evolving their practices and materials to become more and more ethical, which is a great step in the right direction.

Thought

“A little bit of thought, a big difference” is the motto of this vegan clothing brand.

With natural and sustainable materials, Thought uses industry standards to ensure their processes are the highest recognised benchmarks they can be, claiming to learn, adapt and constantly evolve.

Not only this, but they want to “foster change” and see the importance of educating and the strength in partnering with the right people.

Also, they support community-led and important charity projects such as Smart Works, which provide support to aspiring, out-of-work women – with interview training and head-to-toe dressing.

Check out Thought's range below:

BAM

BAM is on top of its sustainably-sourced clothing and goes beyond the fabric production stage to create a positive impact on its entire supply chain.

Their bamboo fabric is manufactured in China in a sustainably managed forest. Did you know that bamboo grows naturally and fast, with yields of up to 10x higher than cotton, without the need for pesticides?

Similar to other brands, they also foster a very transparent approach to their customers with the heaps of information on the factories and supply chains involved.

Check out their cool garments here:

Organic Basics

This brand is taking extra steps to ensure that its vision of sustainability is met and followed through. Therefore, Organic Basics only work with trusted, certified factory partners – to ensure that workers are not exploited and treated fairly.

Grown on the coast of the Aegean Sea, their cotton is certified organic, which is chemical-free and surprisingly durable. Their approach is informative and very honest.

They insist on making clothes for simplicity, function and to last. The coolest thing, perhaps, is an alternative Low Impact alternative of their website.

Matt & Nat

Matt & Nat commit to not using leather or any other animal-based materials in their designs. They constantly evolve every season, exploring new ways to improve their sustainable practices.

Since 2007, they have been committed to using recycled plastics for their bags.

A variety of high-quality vegan materials are used in the creation of their products. PU (polyurethane) is a biodegradable material, making it less harmful to our planet.

This brand ensures that the conditions of the workers are up to par with their standards.

Lefrik

Lefrik make 100 per cent recycled bags and travelling accessories.

The brand contributes to the environment by reducing the use of virgin polyester and rather extending the life of discarded plastic bottles while saving energy in the production process.

They are vegan, too!

They continuously challenge themselves by investigating new materials, styles and concepts. Alongside manufacturing their bags, Lefrik gets involves in so many different initiatives – they’re constantly busy ensuring the future of our planet.

Seasalt

Seasalt has goals that have always been simple: to craft beautiful clothing that inspires and endures, as well as to reduce the impact of their business on the environment. This company have bold targets - but full transparency.

They bring a new level of ambition to their sustainability strategy around four pillars:

Product, Environment, Innovation, Community

They pledge to donate to charity by the end of 2025, to be Carbon Net-Zero by 2040, 100% GOTS certified cotton by 2024 and zero-waste to landfills by the end of 2023.

Sugarhill Brighton

Sugarhill's mission statement is "our small team are dedicated to designing clothing our customers love to wear, produced in an ethical and sustainable way, enabling us to support social and environmental causes close to our hearts."

They are a family run business founded by Brother and Sister team Pawel and Aleks. When they say "small team", they mean it! This small business currently employs 15 people and 99% of the staff are women. Sugarhill Brighton is a firm believer in beach lunch breaks, park rounders and office dogs, as well as being a Living Wage Employer.

Plus, in 2022, this brand introduced the launch of a Curve range up to size 22 for Spring/Summer 2022. So, Autumn Winter 2022 will see over 75% of Sugarhill’s designs available in Size 8-22. Isn't that cool?

Awesome! They do fantastic work. Read more of their mission here.

As for garments, here are some of our favourites:

Just so you know, whilst we may receive a commission or other compensation from the links on this website, we never allow this to influence product selections - read why you should trust us