Are we getting ruder on our roads?

Are we getting ruder on our roads?
road-rage-poor-driving

Britain has always had a proud reputation of being a polite and considerate nation. But if you’ve noticed an increase of poor behaviour on our roads, you’re not alone. A massive 75 per cent of drivers believe motoring habits on UK roads are worse than ever before, leaving many of us thinking, 'whatever happened to good manners'?   

“With more hectic and demanding lifestyles, stress has become one of the most common causes of poor driving,” says Katherine Lewis, Debrett’s spokesperson and an expert in behavioural science. So it’s no surprise that one quarter of the motorists surveyed confessed to forgetting their manners when in a hurry.

But the research also shows that it’s witnessing other drivers exhibiting poor behaviour that gets 48 per cent of us  so riled up that it put us in a bad mood. So what behaviour that grinds our gears the most? According to Ford Vignale and Debrett, some of the worst offenders include...

Throwing rubbish out the window

road-rage-driving-poor-manners

 

Making loud hands-free calls

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Playing music too loudly

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Inconsiderate parking

road-rage-driving-poor-manners

 

Grooming and/or applying make up

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Aggressive cyclists

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Pedestrians on phones

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Horse riders on a busy road

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Not showing a thank you sign

road-rage-poor-driving

 

Tailgating

road-rage-poor-driving

 

How can we bring motoring manners back?

To offer a solution to the UK’s dwindling road manners, Ford Vignale has partnered with Debrett to release a Guide to Great British Road Etiquette, encouraging drivers to overcome everyday frustrations and practise a few common courtesies for calm and enjoyable journeys.

Among their top ten tips, they encourage drivers to say thank you more often, to keep the volume down when listening to music or speaking on hands-free, and to refrain from grooming-on-the-go.