CookingBauer XcelPancakes

What's the secret behind making a perfect pancake?

CookingBauer XcelPancakes
What's the secret behind making a perfect pancake?
pancakes.jpg
  • Choose your pan carefully: Using a shallow cast iron frying pan is traditionally the best way of getting a perfectly round and flat pancake as they distribute the heat more evently across the pan. They're a bit heavier than a normal non-stick pan though, so you'll need to use two hands to toss.
  • Whisk, whisk and whisk the pancake mixture. This helps get lots of air into the batter, making the pancakes lighter, fluffier and more lovely.
  • Keep it hot: heat up your pan for two to three minutes before adding butter to the pan. Once the butter has melted, then you can then add your batter mix.
  • Butter up: Always use butter rather than oil in the pan, as it gives a much creamier flavour.
  • Thin and crispy: If you like thin, crepe-style pancake, pop two tablespoons of batter mix into the pan and swirl with a spatula to spread evenly around the pan.
  • Take time out: Cook each pancake for about 30 seconds on each side. Give it a flip at least once, but twice or more will give a better result if you are feeling especially enthusiastic!

From the traditional to the adventurous, we've got all sorts of pancake recipes to try out here.

Did you know?

  • Shrove Tuesday is known as Pancake Day because pancake recipes were traditionally made to use up stocks of flour, milk and eggs, which were forbidden during the abstinence of Lent
  • The word ‘Shrove’ is from the Old English word ‘shrive’, which means to ‘confess all sins’.  On Shrove Tuesday, people would go to church and be ‘shriven’ ahead of the start of Lent on Ash Wednesday
  • In the UK,  ‘shroving’ was a custom in which children sang or recited poetry in exchange for food or money
  • ‘Lent Crocking’ was used to describe a custom where children would knock on doors asking for pancakes – and throw broken crockery at the doors of those who declined their requests!
  • Pancake races are held around the UK on Pancake Day.  One of the most famous takes place in Olney, where according to local folklore, a woman of Olney heard the shriving bell in 1445 while she was making pancakes and rushed to the church, frying pan in hand.  People who take part in the now world-famous Olney Pancake Race must be local housewives and wear an apron and hat or scarf when they take part!
  • Pancake Day is celebrated differently around the world. In Brazil, Pancake Day is known as Terca-feira gorda and is the final day of the carnival in Rio De Janeiro while in New Orleans the day is marked by the Mardi Gras carnival

Tips from PLj Lemon Juice.

There's more recipes and food ideas in every issue of Yours magazine, out every fortnight on a Tuesday.